Culture, Music

Jam of the Week: Wolf Alice – Freazy

Wolf Alice - My Love is Cool (1500x844)Alt-rock four-piece, Wolf Alice, are a band that have been in my periphery since 2013 – I vaguely recall seeing the eye-catching cover for their Blush EP, released via Chess Club. Members Ellie Rowsell, Joel Amey, Joff Oddie and Theo Ellis have being getting plaudits from all corners of the music industry. And with their debut album, My Love is Cool, out this Monday, June 22, I’ve finally tuned into what all the fuss is about.

From the instant their song ‘Freazy’ begins, Wolf Alice send lush, ethereal sound waves gushing forth from your speakers. The percussion is nonintrusive. The guitar chords, a steady haze of shimmering vibrations. And the harmoniously layered vocals, radiant and dreamy. It’s three minutes of total joy that brings summer into your day with the strength of two suns. Needless to say, you need to hear this NOW. For more thoughts on Wolf Alice, check out PressPlay’s review of their debut album.

Freazy features on My Love is Cool, out now on Dirty Hit / RCA Records.

Image: Dirty Hit/RCA Records

Art & Design, Culture, Music

Choice Cuts: Gorillaz – Demon Days

Parlophone Records, 2005Gorillaz - Demon Days artwork, wallpaper edit (1024x576)A gimmick. That’s what they put Gorillaz’ success down to. Despite everything that had been achieved by this unusual musical concoction in the 18 months since the launch of their 2001 debut album, detractors still labelled them a here today, gone tomorrow band. But little did they know that the virtual band, created by musician, Damon Albarn, and cartoonist, Jamie Hewlett, would front what would later be acknowledged as one of the most influential and progressive records of the noughties: Demon Days.

Culture, Music

Andreya Triana – Giants review

Andreya Triana, Giants press photo, 01 (800x450)The debut album from soul-stirring London songstress, Andreya Triana, was a beautiful encouragement to explore the forgotten streets of your town, if a little too solemn in places to appeal to a mainstream infatuated with the Adeles and Emeli Sandés of the world. By contrast, Giants is a luminous, pictorial, thoroughly uplifting journey, and it deserves your fullest attention.